Tag: Title IX

Innocence is Not Proof of Innocence

Another big week, but I thought I’d put this up. How bad has our college kangaroo court system gotten? You can now be effectively expelled for rape when the supposed victim says she wasn’t raped. At all. As long as someone at some point thinks the sex was non-consensual, it’s fair game.

The good news is that the student is fighting back and is suing the Office of Civil Rights itself for demanding that college water down their judicial systems like this.

Friday Quick Hits

A few stories I haven’t gotten time for full blog posts on:

  • I kind of like Bernie Sanders as a candidate. Not because I agree with him on anything — I don’t. And not because I’d vote for him — I wouldn’t. I like him out there because at least he’s honest about what he thinks. I prefer an honest socialist over whatever dumbed down pap Clinton is selling while pretending to be our friend. This week, someone dug up a 1972 article he wrote about how men fantasize about abusing women and women fantasize about being raped. The conservative critics are right: this would be a *huge* deal is a Republican had written it. On the other hand, it was written 43 years ago and is so incoherent, I have to believe that Sanders wrote it on a roll of toilet paper while writhing on a bathroom floor in the midst of a bad LSD trip.
  • Texas has been on the receiving end of some terrible rains and floods recently. The cause, according to the media, is global warming. This was the same global warming that was causing droughts three years ago. Look, I accept that global warming is real, but this is getting ridiculous. Not everything is a result of global warming. I’m pretty sure we had weather before global warming. And I’m pretty sure we’ll continue to have it after global warming is solved. Maybe global warming will make torrential rains more likely, but if so it will mean something like a few extra floods a decade.
  • Nebraska became the first red state to abolish the death penalty, overriding the governor’s veto. While I’m not quite anti-capital punishment, I’m fine with this. The death penalty isn’t worth the trouble and expense. And Nebraska hasn’t executed anyone in 18 years anyway.
  • Dennis Hastert is being prosecuted for structuring and lying to investigators as he was paying hush money to someone. You can read Ken White about how these charges are basically made up. It’s likely being pursued because the statute of limitations has run out on what he did do. Illegal leaks indicate he sexually abused a student while he was a wrestling coach. I deplore the fed’s tendency to make up crimes. That doesn’t change Haster’s status as a scumbag if these allegations are true.
  • This week’s must-read is from Laura Kipnis a liberal feminist professor who found herself at the center of a Title IX inquisition because she had the temerity to question the narrative the sexual paranoia our college campuses are caving into.

Generation Eggshell

Judith Shulevitz has a great article up at the NYT about how our colleges and universities have gone to absurd lengths to coddle students’ delicate psyches.

KATHERINE BYRON, a senior at Brown University and a member of its Sexual Assault Task Force, considers it her duty to make Brown a safe place for rape victims, free from anything that might prompt memories of trauma.

So when she heard last fall that a student group had organized a debate about campus sexual assault between Jessica Valenti, the founder of feministing.com, and Wendy McElroy, a libertarian, and that Ms. McElroy was likely to criticize the term “rape culture,” Ms. Byron was alarmed. “Bringing in a speaker like that could serve to invalidate people’s experiences,” she told me. It could be “damaging.”

Ms. Byron and some fellow task force members secured a meeting with administrators. Not long after, Brown’s president, Christina H. Paxson, announced that the university would hold a simultaneous, competing talk to provide “research and facts” about “the role of culture in sexual assault.” Meanwhile, student volunteers put up posters advertising that a “safe space” would be available for anyone who found the debate too upsetting.

The “safe space” was basically a toddler room:

The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma.

You really should really the whole thing. It gets into the increasing culture of creating “safe spaces” where students can be sheltered from ideas that might challenge their beliefs or offend them. Only some ideas, of course. If a Muslim student complained that miniskirts made him uncomfortable or a Christian complained that gays “triggered” him, I doubt they would get much sympathy.

As an academic, I want to make one point: most students aren’t like this. Most of the students I deal with are hard-working rational people who don’t really care about political correctness. The problem is that the whiners — the product of increasing helicopter parenting and schools obsessed with promoting “self-esteem” — have the floor. Moreover, the government is aggressively using Title VIII and IX to push schools into compliance with politically correct agendas. And it’s affecting how our schools operate.

I’m old enough to remember a time when college students objected to providing a platform to certain speakers because they were deemed politically unacceptable. Now students worry whether acts of speech or pieces of writing may put them in emotional peril. Two weeks ago, students at Northwestern University marched to protest an article by Laura Kipnis, a professor in the university’s School of Communication. Professor Kipnis had criticized — O.K., ridiculed — what she called the sexual paranoia pervading campus life

Last fall, the president of Smith College, Kathleen McCartney, apologized for causing students and faculty to be “hurt” when she failed to object to a racial epithet uttered by a fellow panel member at an alumnae event in New York. The offender was the free-speech advocate Wendy Kaminer, who had been arguing against the use of the euphemism “the n-word” when teaching American history or “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” In the uproar that followed, the Student Government Association wrote a letter declaring that “if Smith is unsafe for one student, it is unsafe for all students.”

“It’s amazing to me that they can’t distinguish between racist speech and speech about racist speech, between racism and discussions of racism,” Ms. Kaminer said in an email.

Professors are guiding their course work away from anything controversial as well. For example, law professors are shying away from discussing rape law, lest they trigger someone. Entire hordes of administrators are hired to make sure everyone is being sensitive and caring (and then student wonder why college costs so much).

So how can we stop this rising Cult of the Victim? Pushback on the campuses themselves is a big part. But another big help would be for the federal government to affirm its supposed commitment to free expression. A complaint that a university is “unsafe” can trigger a potentially damaging federal investigation. In the past, the government has respected free speech but that commitment has weakened in recent years as universities and the government embrace the Left-wing notion that some speech isn’t really speech, but hostile action.

The recent SAE incident was a perfect opportunity for this. The Department of Education could have made it clear that, as students at a public university, the students had free speech rights. But they let that opportunity pass by. And I don’t see this Administration ever standing up the campus politeness police.