Tag Archive: Banking in the United States

The Definition of Insanity

Is government housing policy:

Recent steps by federal regulators make it clear: low down-payment loans, a feature of the housing market’s boom, are coming back.

On Monday, Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mel Watt announced that mortgage-finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would start backing loans with down payments as low as 3%.

And on Tuesday, three federal agencies approved a loosened set of mortgage-lending rules, removing a requirement for a 20% down

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WTF does this mean?

One of the biggest “Too big to fail” banks , and one of the ones deepest in bed with our government, has just put in place regulations that limit cash withdrawals and prohibit all outgoing international bank wires. As you can see I needed to link to a foreign article to get this information sourced, as our news media here in the US seems to be uninterested in talking about this baffling event. This … Read more

If you want to be pissed at the big banks do it for this reason

Because having politicians making rules that pay off their favorite big banks in return for the big money and power they then help the politician get is the real reason to be pissed at these big banks that are in bed with the politicians.

So what if we told you that, by our calculations, the largest U.S. banks aren’t really profitable at all? What if the billions of dollars they allegedly earn for their shareholders

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The Bailouts and the Risk

It’s Bank Bash time again here at RTFLC. Presented for your consideration: the Atlantic’s expose on how tenuous the banks hold on sanity really is:

The financial crisis had many causes—too much borrowing, foolish investments, misguided regulation—but at its core, the panic resulted from a lack of transparency. The reason no one wanted to lend to or trade with the banks during the fall of 2008, when Lehman Brothers collapsed, was that no one could

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Modern Day Javerts

You know why I get irritated when people call Obama a Secret Communist Anti-Colonialist Crypto-Marxist Douchbag? Because if he actually were one, it would almost be preferable. At the very least, we wouldn’t have shit like this:

Richard Eggers doesn’t look like a mastermind of financial crime.

The former farm boy speaks deliberately, can’t remember the last time he got a speeding ticket, and favors suspenders, horn-rimmed glasses and plaid shirts. But the 68-year-old

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Under President Obama & the democrats….

WaPo points out that data gathered shows that Wall Street firms — independent companies and the securities-trading arms of banks — have earned more in the first 2 1/2 years of the Obama administration than they did during the eight years of the George W. Bush administration. Why is this happening?

Behind this turnaround, in significant measure, are government policies that helped the financial sector avert collapse and then gave financial firms huge benefits

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And Burn the Banks Down

Part two of my posts on housing and banking.

If you want to know why I have some shred of sympathy for OWS despite some of their repugnant behavior (that Kos link is priceless, BTW), here is the reason:

Liberal protesters “occupying” Wall Street hate the big banks, which they see as the engine of capitalism. But conservatives ought to hate the big banks because they are the enemies of capitalism.

In addition to the … Read more

The Taibbi Plan

Matt Taibbi, one of the key members of the More Clever than Smart Club, has an essay on what he would have OccupyWallStreet demand. It’s making the rounds. Let’s go through it. I’ve almost finished reading The Big Short, a book you really should read to understand the recent financial crisis. So this will serve two purposes: responding to Taibbi and talking about what I learned from Michael Lewis.

1. Break up the monopolies.

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The Last Bailout … and the Next

Jesus:

Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke’s unprecedented effort to keep the economy from plunging into depression included lending banks and other companies as much as $1.2 trillion of public money, about the same amount U.S. homeowners currently owe on 6.5 million delinquent and foreclosed mortgages. The largest borrower, Morgan Stanley (MS), got as much as $107.3 billion, while Citigroup took $99.5 billion and Bank of America $91.4 billion, according to a Bloomberg News compilation

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