Video Monday: Takei and Hobby Lobby

I bookmarked these two video over the weekend. The first is a TED talk from George Takei. While I’m not fond of TED talks — they often cross me as smug and overly confident in their points — this one explains why George Takei still loves the country that interred him during the war:

(I’ve found this embed tends to hang. If someone has a better link, I’ll update the post.)

This comes close to my view of America. The United States, like all human institutions, is flawed and capable of doing awful things. But the principles on which our nation is founded are a beacon to humanity. And I would take the achievements of America, its role in the world and its history over any other nation on Earth. Takei’s story sounds familiar to me — and probably to many of you as well. Both of my paternal grandparents fled the “Jewish crescent” of Eastern Europe in the early 20th century. Despite the virulent anti-semitism they encountered — they vividly remembered the Leo Frank lynching — they still believed there was nowhere else in the world they would rather be.

The second I couldn’t resist. Takei is calling for a boycott of Hobby after the Supreme Court’s narrow decision last week. This completely useless gesture would accomplish little except making liberals feel better (how many liberals actually go to Hobby Lobby?) Reason, by contrast, proposes some changes to the law that would actually do some good:

The amazing thing about Obamacare is that many liberals believed — many still believe — that Obama “stood up” to the special interests and the healthcare industry. This could not be more false. He “stood up” to the insurance industry by forcing everyone to buy their product, outlawing the cheaper versions of their product and refusing to break the intra-state cartels. He “stood up” to healthcare providers by mandating coverage of expensive procedures and not even considering obvious cost-reducing measure like making birth control available over the counter.

All three of Reasons’s suggestions would be diametrically opposed by the healthcare industry lobbyists who wrote and campaigned for Obamacare. Insurance companies don’t want to offer cheap catastrophic plans. They certainly don’t want to compete across state lines. And providers don’t want more competition And so we can expect the liberal wing to “stand up for the little guy” by continuing to acquiesce to every demand of the industry they supposedly hate.

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