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  1. Seattle Outcast

    Obama’s leash holder, Valerie Jarrett, must be completely beside herself wondering how this happened. Obama waiting for the teleprompter to tell him what to say later tonight.

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  2. CM

    From a friend of a friend (I certainly can’t vouch for accuracy):

    To my foreign friends: In Egypt, over the past few days, millions of people (not thousands like the media says) have taken to the streets. The numbers were much higher than those who came out in 2011. What was their message? For the President to step down. The President was a part of an Islamist group called the Muslim Brotherhood, which is seen by many (and the West until recently) as an extremist group. He was the first freely elected president, yet over the past year he has taken steps that were seen as making Egypt fall into economic disaster. He freed convicted Islamist terrorists, who were then freely spreading their messages of hate and being hailed as heroes by extremists. He tightened the grip over media freedom, continuing arrests of journalists and closing down TV channels opposing him.

    A constitution was being rewritten by a group of people representing different parts of Egypt. When Christians, liberals and some other non-Islamist members of that group sounded their concerns over the wording of the constitution, they got no response from an Islamist majority and decided to boycott that committee. The President then decided to go ahead with passing the constitution without any of the minorities and the constitution had no reassurances for any minorities in Egypt.

    The President recently made some changes in political positions, including appointing a governor in Luxor, the biggest tourist attraction in Egypt, who was part of the terrorist group who killed tourists in Luxor in 1997!

    The President sat at a conference amongst convicted terrorists spreading their hateful messages about minorities in Egypt, including Shiia, and the following day 4 Shiia people were burnt to death at their home by a mob and nothing came out of it.

    The President came out last week in a speech talking about his achievements and shortfalls over his year in presidency, mainly blaming his shortfalls on his opposition, mentioning specific names of opposition figures as the culprits!

    It was after that speech that millions of people have had enough and went out onto the streets in protest, as they saw him as an unfit person to run the country. CNN estimated the numbers at over 30 million, while BBC World called it the largest human demonstrations in history. I don’t know the exact figures, but what I know is that 99% of the people I know personally were on the street or were pro the demonstrations. I literally only have 3 people on my FB timeline who were still supporting the President (out of over 1,000 FB friends).

    The army’s involvement in all this started right after the ousting of Mubarak in 2011. They have taken the task of running the country, temporarily, until presidential elections were concluded in June 2012. Some people blamed the army back then for some policies that they saw drove Egypt into a more dire situation, and large numbers took to the streets towards the end of 2011 and the first half of 2012 calling for them to give up running the country in favour of civilian rule. This is where the Western media is starting to get it wrong. They are wondering how the people who came out back then, calling on the military to leave are now praising them for takin over again.

    There are 2 major differences: 1. the people on the streets now didn’t all want the military out the first time. The numbers are multiples of the numbers who came out last year and 2. the army is not getting involved in the running of the country this time around.

    In a very simplistic way, the army went out with their helicopters to gauge the extent of the protests, both pro and against. They saw that the situation could lead into bloody fighting if left unattended to. They called on all the opposing forces to sit down together and come to some agreements. That didn’t happen, and I’m not going to go into who was the reason here, as it may start a huge debate. Anyway, when this didn’t happen, they decided to side with the larger numbers, according to the aerial footages. They met with the main leading figures of these opposition movements as well as representatives from the Church, the Azhar (Islamic equivalent of the Church), some of the youth leaders, thinkers, and other public figures. They also called on the Muslim Brotherhood to join the conversation, but the MB rejected the call. They had the meeting yesterday, where those present agreed that the President has fallen very short on his obligations, and that 3 more years in office may just spell the end of Egypt as we’ve known it and wanted it.

    An agreement was reached that a specific democratic political process was needed to be followed in order not to give any person or group powers to turn the country back into a dictatorship, where a new committee representing all Egyptians was going to write a new inclusive and tolerant constitution, after which, and according to its articles, new presidential and parliamentary elections will be had. In the mean time, and according to all previous Egyptian constitutions, the Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court would run the country, temporarily, with a coalition government, with a clear end once these steps have been taken.

    The army’s involvement in all this, as well as the police, by the way, is to side with what they saw as the majority and protecting the interests of the people, not their own interests.

    If the situation was left to continue, the President would have made it even worse. On his last speech on Tuesday night, he said that if he goes there will be a civil war. It was also the same attitude that everyone was criticising Mubarak for in 2011 when he said that if he went the country would go into chaos. Whether I agree with these statements or not doesn’t matter, but he couldn’t possibly expect to say the same thing that people were against the first time around, thinking that things have changed.

    So, when I now see Western governments and media coming out calling this a military coup and that Egyptian are ruining the democratic process by ousting a democratically elected president, I have to get slightly agitated! In the past couple of weeks, the American ambassador to Egypt has been meeting with leading figures of the Muslim Brotherhood (those who are in government and those who aren’t) only to come out calling on Egyptians to back the president! It was her and her team who were relaying the one-sided message back to Washington, hence Obama’s unbalanced and skewed view of the situation.

    Ladies and gentlemen, what is going on in Egypt is not a military coup. The people have decided that their leaders were too incompetent to continue their term in office and had to have some strong support, hence asking for the army’s support. Since the opposition and minorities do not belong to one single group, and to give out a message of strength, the head of the military was chosen to give the message of those who are protesting, taking his feedback from those people.

    Democracy doesn’t stop at the ballot box, but it starts there. This is what we all should understand.

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  3. Mississippi Yankee

    The President came out last week in a speech talking about his achievements and shortfalls over his year in presidency, mainly blaming his shortfalls on his opposition, mentioning specific names of opposition figures as the culprits!

    It’s like Morsi was taking his cues, verbatim, from the Obama handbook. Right up to and including giving positions of power and dominance to his friends and political allies.

    But sadly the expression “It can’t happen here” appears to be correct. Our dumbed down American population, for the most part, hasn’t the gumption nor the will to rise up and replace our dick-tater.

    Happy Dependence Day 2013

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  4. CM

    The Egypt situation does raise the difficult question: When is it acceptable to support a military coup against a democratically elected government?
    I don’t think there are any clear answers – it’s a matter of considering the specifics of the situation (e.g. a coup against Hitler wouldn’t have gone amiss in retrospect).
    Also, ‘support’ is a continuum and can take many guises. Is ‘doing nothing’ in effect supporting the coup? Or is it doing the right (and ‘neutral’) thing by staying out of the political affairs of a democratic sovereign nation?

    MY all leaders give positions of power and dominance to their friends and political allies. If you don’t agree, which leaders haven’t?

    I don’t see how this outcome has anything to do with Obama, or anything he has done (or not done).

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  5. Mississippi Yankee

    I don’t see how this outcome has anything to do with Obama, or anything he has done (or not done).

    Willful ignorance is still part of your narrative® I see.

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  6. Xetrov

    It’s like Morsi was taking his cues, verbatim, from the Obama handbook. Right up to and including giving positions of power and dominance to his friends and political allies.

    Fixed –

    It’s like Morsi was taking his cues, verbatim, from the Politician handbook. Right up to and including giving positions of power and dominance to his friends and political allies.

    George Washington was the first US President to enact Cronyism. Obama certainly didn’t invent it, and won’t be the last.

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