Sandy

The Frankenstorm is due to pass over us with the eye about 15 miles from my house sometime in the next 24 hours. I expect to lose power but we’re on high ground and staying home and the storm will have vented much of its fury on New Jersey, so we shouldn’t be in any real danger. (Thank God we have New Jersey to shield us from this stuff.)

Use this thread to post any updates or thoughts. It’s looking very bad but not catastrophic at this point. I just wish the networks would stop the hazing ritual of putting reporters on the beach for this stuff. It’s ridiculous.

Political implications are minimal. Nate Silver has some discussion here. We might see some weird polling numbers (although Gallup is suspending polling until the crisis has passed). I don’t think this will impact the Presidential race unless Obama badly mismanages it. And that appears unlikely since Chris Christie is doing a lot of the heavy lifting and, by all accounts, doing a fantastic job. If you’re in New Jersey and still have power, his Twitter feed is island of calm reassurance.

Anyone else in the path of this, stay safe. And see you on the flip side.

Comments are closed.

  1. CM

    Yep, best of luck to you Hal, and anyone else here in the path. I’ll send out good vibes that you all survive intact and with as little damage as possible.

    I don’t even know why Al Franken would do such a thing.

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  2. HARLEY

    I hope everyone pulls through this well…..

    Thank God we have New Jersey

    , i don’t think those words have ever been strung together in American history before…………

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  3. Seattle Outcast

    Natural disasters and fucked up weather is exactly why I think new homes should come equipped with a back-up generator and an automatic transfer switch as standard – just like hot water, electricity, doors, etc. Why the hell are you in a default position of always being dependent on the local grid for power? It’s stupid.

    So yeah, a 10KW backup generator is on my “to do” list, but I wish it wasn’t as now it costs more than having it part of house from the initial design.

    Stay safe, keep the camping supplies close at hand, and answer the door with a shotgun until order is fully restored.

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  4. Biggie G

    I don’t want to jinx anything, but it hasn’t been too bad here. It has been raining all day, but the winds haven’t been real bad yet. The barrier islands down the shore (Atlantic City, Ocean City etc.) have been slammed with flooding. Some people I know have lost power, but not even a flicker here.

    We’ve been defending PA for 20 million years and we’ll be doing it for 20 million more.

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  5. repmom

    Generators are expensive. We survived a week of no power after Ike. Spent the week partying with friends and neighbors, cooking everyone’s meat from freezers before it spoiled. Gas grills and cooktops are handy. We played cards one night on the patio by candlelight.

    It was nice to sit out on the patio that morning after the storm hit with a fresh cup of coffee from gas cooktop and old camping coffee pot and watch the rest of the storm pass over.

    Of course, we were lucky that it turned cool, and we didn’t need air conditioning. Otherwise, we would have been quite miserable.

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  6. CM

    I’ve been streaming The Weather Channel here for the last 4 hours. Right now they’re saying it’s worse than feared in NYC. Stock Exchange is 3 feet under water. Good news is that high tide has been reached.

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  7. Mississippi Yankee

    My “east coast elitist” brother has virtually ensured that the entire North Shore of Massachusetts will be spared the wrath of Sandy. He has lost power with numerous thunder storm not to mention heavy snows in recent years and his knee jerk reaction is to wait for ‘mother government’ to restore power/order.

    Well he has gone and bought a generator. This news amazed me as he must get his wife to do anything more mechanical than change a light bulb. Oh and if you think he might have desired to help himself then I must add A week before Sandy he called me to say he was mailing me a check for $1200. It was part of my mothers life insurance policy that came up in my dad’s will.

    Now I think I paid for HIS generator. Oh well been supporting broke-dick liberals all my life why should today be any different?

    To all you East Coaster remember a cubit= 1.5 feet. Stay dry!

    Running joke in my family about this hurricane, my 2nd (and last) wife was named Sandy

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  8. Hal_10000 *

    We lived in Baltimore when Isabel came through. Were without power for six days: frustrating because the Section 8 housing across the street had power after 12 hours. it was romantic for a couple of nights. After that, we sort of missed electricity.

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  9. Mississippi Yankee

    Cm, I was saddened to see last night that gravity has taken it’s toll on our dear Gretchen since her “Notorious Betty Page” days.

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  10. CM

    Boardwalk Empire, prime time HBO here in the USofA

    Primetime SoHo channel here in N of Z.
    Granted, time has had its way, but as far as it goes, I was still pleased. Things could have gone way worse than that. She’ll be 40 next week.

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  11. Mississippi Yankee

    She’ll be 40 next week.

    Damn, I have children older than that.

    Back to the topic at hand:

    Hurricane Sandy Soldiers Guard Tomb of Unknown Soldier!! 60+ MPH WINDS

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  12. repmom

    Crap. Please ignore the thumbs down on MY’s Unknown Soldier comment. Was trying to give a thumbs up, touched the wrong one. Always doing that on the iPad. Sorry.

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  13. Seattle Outcast

    Generators are expensive

    Not really.

    I can get a 10KW one hooked up to my natural gas line for same or less than an central AC unit. Large portable ones are only a few hundred dollars, same with an installed transfer switch – you can hook up enough juice to your home to run the appliances, watch TV, and keep the AC running for under $1500 if you want to keep pouring gasoline into the tank every few hours. For a lot of people that might be expensive, but for me that’s cheap – hell, I’ve spent more on toys in a week.

    It’s a matter of priorities: shall I spend $5K+ on something used every few years for a few hours/day at most, or spend it on X which I’ll start enjoying right now. It’s when the disaster hits and you’re tossing spoiled food and freezing your ass off that you realize that you may have chosen the “wrong’ investment.

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  14. Hal_10000 *

    Thankfully, we didn’t get much. Didn’t even lose power. Lots of rain and some wind but the mountains protected us. Watching the news this morning… egad.

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  15. Hal_10000 *

    I think one of the takeaways from this is how well-prepared we were and how well Christie, the first responders and … ugh … Bloomberg … are dealing with it. It’s bad. But given the scale, it could be much much worse. Amazing what happens when you have competent governors in charge.

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  16. Thrill

    It may be callous to say it, but Katrina did for state and local emergency planning what the Titanic did for sea travel safety. Nobody wants to be short of lifejackets anymore.

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  17. Hal_10000 *

    Thrill, I was just thinking that. I think that’s one of the reasons the Weather Service was hyping the storm (which did turn out to be as bad as feared): better to overprepare than undeprepare.

    The images coming of New York and New Jersey are awful but it’s looking like it won’t be too bad in terms of loss of life, which is what really matters. The feeling I get watching the coverage is that this is bad but the preparation and response have been excellent.

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  18. CM

    Nate Silver
    @fivethirtyeight

    CAN’T BELIEVE METEOROLOGISTS USED MATH AND SCIENCE TO PREDICT THIS STORM. THEY MUST BE MAGIC WIZARDS.

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  19. Thrill

    Thrill, I was just thinking that. I think that’s one of the reasons the Weather Service was hyping the storm

    NWS really changed the way they alert people in harm’s way after the Joplin, MO tornado, I believe. I remember reading an article earlier this year where they said that they were going to start being extremely blunt but descriptive in their warnings because a lot of survivors said that they heard the sirens going off and heard the weathermen say to take cover, but they didn’t listen and almost got killed. We can’t know how many of the dead also ignored the warnings but weren’t as lucky.

    Possibly the biggest killer in storms is complacency. People just don’t believe that they really have to evacuate or take shelter. I appreciate that the NWS now directly addresses that mentality. It probably saved hundreds of lives.

    I met a meteorologist with NWS last year and I can assure you that they are an extremely knowledgeable and professional group. If they tell you to move, LISTEN!

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  20. hist_ed

    Thanks for the vids. No real need to comment on the Tomb of the Unknown. They’re Marines, they understand honor, sacrifice and responsibility.

    On the NY building: The thing I noticed was that about five seconds after the wall gave way, firefighters were running into a collapsing building.

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  21. Xetrov

    CAN’T BELIEVE METEOROLOGISTS USED MATH AND SCIENCE TO PREDICT THIS STORM. THEY MUST BE MAGIC WIZARDS.

    Seven days out I saw a meteorology broadcast saying the storm wouldn’t hit the East Coast. Most were saying at that point that if (big If, most reports I’ve read said about a 50% chance at that point) it hit the East Coast at all, it would be into New England, and not affect DC. Math, Science, and a little luck/guessing/waiting for more data. If a meteorologist tells me it’s going to rain where I live, I can almost guarantee a sunny cloud free day.

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  22. CM

    Seven days out I saw a meteorology broadcast saying the storm wouldn’t hit the East Coast. Most were saying at that point that if (big If, most reports I’ve read said about a 50% chance at that point) it hit the East Coast at all, it would be into New England, and not affect DC. Math, Science, and a little luck/guessing/waiting for more data. If a meteorologist tells me it’s going to rain where I live, I can almost guarantee a sunny cloud free day.

    Seven days out is a long long time.

    Scott Stossel @SStossel:

    That Romney convention zinger about Obama wanting to stop the seas from rising seeming less zingy about now

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  23. CM

    In a stunning spectacle of atmospheric violence, Superstorm Sandy roared ashore in New Jersey last night with sustained winds of 90 mph and a devastating storm surge that crippled coastal New Jersey and New York. Sandy’s record size allowed the historic storm to bring extreme weather to over 100 million Americans, from Chicago to Maine and from Michigan to Florida. Sandy’s barometric pressure at landfall was 946 mb, tying the Great Long Island Express Hurricane of 1938 as the most powerful storm ever to hit the Northeast U.S. north of Cape Hatteras, NC. New York City experienced its worst hurricane since its founding in 1624, as Sandy’s 9-foot storm surge rode in on top of a high tide to bring water levels to 13.88′ at The Battery, smashing the record 11.2′ water level recorded during the great hurricane of 1821. Damage from Superstorm Sandy will likely be in the tens of billions, making the storm one of the five most expensive disasters in U.S. history.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/article.html?entrynum=2282

    Love Jeff Masters’ blog.

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  24. Xetrov

    The Goreacle has come out of his hole to lay the blame for Sandy on Global Warming’s altar.

    I hear he also said all the other major hurricanes that have hit the Northeast, going back to 1635 were also caused by SUV driving bastards.

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  25. CM

    Of course no one can prove that this storm was “caused by” climate change and global warming. But the increasingly frequent occurrence of “unusual,” “extreme,” and “once per century” weather events — heat, cold, drought, flood — is in keeping with all warnings about the effects of climate change (as explained here). I’m not arguing the entire climate change case now, and don’t have special standing to do so anyway. I am saying that this reminds me of the mounting evidence about smoking and health, when I was a kid — the medical conventions my father went to in the early 1960s were full of smokers, those a decade later had practically no smokers — or about environmentalism generally in the ‘Silent Spring’ era. Denialism continues, until all of a sudden it is irrelevant.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/10/post-hurricane-placeholder/264277/

    E.g. it’s now irrelevant that until just recently, a whole load of people were denying that warming was even taking place.

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