The Buckeyballs Strike Back

As you know, the CPSC wants to ban Buckeyballs, the tiny but powerful magnets that many people, including me, have as a desk toy. The reason is that some kids have eaten them and gotten very serious injuries when the magnets try to align in their intestines. I believe one kid died. The counterpoint is that this is a toy for adults and there is no such thing as a perfectly safe toy.

The beautiful thing is that Buckeyball people are refusing to bend over. They are fighting back, aggressively, most recently with a campaign pointing out how dangerous ordinary everyday items are:

They have also have ads out on hot dogs, coconuts and beds.

We need more of this. This is basically an act of civil disobedience. Most companies would either comply or buy some politicians. Good for Buckeyballs.

Comments are closed.

  1. InsipiD

    Anybody who tries to take my Buckyballs will be force-fed one every two hours until they’re all gone. They’re free to take them so long as they’re eaten.

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  2. Seattle Outcast

    Just another lame attempt to make up what passes as parenting these days.

    I got my first pocketknife and .22 rifle before I started the first grade. Managed to not injure myself or anyone else with them – perhaps because my parents actually took parenting seriously.

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  3. Hal_10000 *

    I may have told this story before, but I brought my daughter into work and she found the Buckeyballs and started playing with them. She was really good at making hexagons. At one point, I warned her not to eat them and she looked at me like I was an idiot.

    SO, I can’t find it but there was a GREAT article recently showing the are that different generations were allowed to wander in. For example, the grandfather was allowed to walk, on his own, six miles to the fishing lake. The son was allowed to walk, on his one, about a mile. The son is now barely able to walk unassisted to the end of his street. It’s just sad.

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  4. CM

    Good on Buckyballs.

    SO, I can’t find it but there was a GREAT article recently showing the are that different generations were allowed to wander in. For example, the grandfather was allowed to walk, on his own, six miles to the fishing lake. The son was allowed to walk, on his one, about a mile. The son is now barely able to walk unassisted to the end of his street. It’s just sad.

    Sad indeed.

    We’ve been wallking with our kids up the local volcano (Mount Albert) and back since they were about two and a half. It’s exactly 2km from our house, mostly uphill, and obviously the same distance back. We started doing it before they realised they could even complain about it. The kid next door has a tantrum if he’s made to walk to school (1.1km) and my 6 year old looks at him like he’s insane.

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  5. Mississippi Yankee

    Buckyballs would be good in a slingshot butt this guy may have found the perfect missile.

    Shooting… ahem… um… “Thingies” with the Slingshot
    (caution: gun pr0n)

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  6. Seattle Outcast

    6 year old looks at him like he’s insane.

    I think your kid is on the right track.

    My wife’s BIL is one of those idiots that won’t let the kids out of his sight or out from under direct adult supervision (which means either soccer or video games about 100% of the time). He then complains that now they are teens they still act like pre-schoolers in many regards.

    When we were kids it was “be back for dinner and curfew” and out the door you went. I spent most of my time on a bike several miles from home with other kids. The amount of trouble we found was actually very small – we knew what sort punishment awaited us for bad behavior, and word of it WOULD find our parents.

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  7. CM

    Yep totally. Same here – we lived right next to a hilly vegetated gully which was basically a jungle (it’s been cleared since). It was set aside as future potential railway land but was never built on. In weekends etc we were gone for hours on end from an early age. No way of holding a kid back from that sort of place.
    My kids attend (or “attended” for the one who is now at school) parent-run ‘Playcentre’ which encourages a degree of risk taking so kids can learn to push themselves physically (and therefore mentally). It’s been really good. And the ‘teachers’ are all parents so you don’t get people running around pulling their hair out because of some sort of health and safety violation.

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  8. Mississippi Yankee

    Where I grew up in Massachusetts a fire alarm whistle went off every night at 5:30PM. This meant that my brother and me had 5 minutes to be home for supper. Tardiness was not tolerated. After supper we were allow out until the street lights came on then again was 5 minutes or else.

    The very first History Channel Magazine did a fascinating article about why so many mostly northern cities and towns had had alarms and whistles that would go off at the supper hours. Most of these towns tied these klaxon horns to their “Sundowner Laws”. And the fact they were all predominately in the north was curious too.

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