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Romney the Bully

Ladies and gentlemen, your nontroversy of the week is the report that Mitt Romney bullied a kid in high school:

There was no Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or sexting when several fellow students at a posh Detroit-area prep school say 18-year-old Romney led a boy posse to hold down one among them perceived as different and snip off his bleached blond hair.

The victim, John Lauber, is dead now, but The Washington Post reported when it broke the story that he was “perpetually teased for his nonconformity and presumed homosexuality” and screamed for help. Though he eventually left the school — kicked out for smoking a cigarette while Romney was not punished — indications are Lauber simply endured, as many of today’s victims are forced to do despite the flood of anti-bullying campaigns in schools and out, advocates said.

The response to this has been, to say the least, interesting. Romney first denied it, then expressed regret. Breitbart, continuing its descent since its founders’ death, is claiming the story is “disintegrating” since one of the victim’s sisters doesn’t remember it and WaPo’s initial report had an error. The Left has shifted focus onto Romney’s response.

But these discussions keep inevitably coming back to the salient point of this issue: Mitt Romney was 16 years old when it happened. 16-year-olds are — and I say this a former 16-year-old myself — assholes. Neurologically, they are assholes. The prefrontal lobe that governs impulse control is not fully developed. And research has shown that teenagers are less empathic to their fellows than even infants. Teenagers are assholes. And anyone who thinks they weren’t an asshole in their teen years is looking into their past through rose-tinted glasses.

I sure was an asshole teen. I could talk about my parents or siblings, but there is one incident in particular that stands out. Back in Hebrew School, we had a kid who was different and he was made fun of relentlessly. I don’t recall how much I participated, but I certainly never stopped it. The only way it was stopped was when the Rabbi sat us down and really laid into us, telling us the young man had already attempted suicide and that we were doing was vicious, sinful and a disgrace to our faith and God (the Torah actually contains more laws governing cruel words than just about any other crime). We backed off but only after we were raked over the coals.

(I was bullied a lot in elementary school. But by high school, I’d basically become invisible to everyone, which suited me fine.)

The continual hounding of a kid is awful. This was not an isolated incident. But … Mitt Romney did not invent bullying. He did invent homophobia. He did not originate the idea of forcefully cutting long hair. He was born into a culture that tolerated and encouraged such things.

This is a non story. And Romney’s response is another non-story. He denies, backpedals and obfuscates about everything. This is who he is and this is what he does. Now we’re noticing this?

What I find particularly bothersome is the attention paid to this story when there are real-life, deadly bullying incidents going on all the time. And they are going under official government approval. And both candidates support the vast majority of it as they vie to become, given their policies, Bully in Chief.

You want to talk about bullies? How about Barack Obama’s Justice Department, harassing legal marijuana clinics, threatening them with tax audits and terrifying their landlords with threats of asset forfeiture? How about eminent domain seizures that strip poor people of their property in favor of the rich — theft upheld by the God damned Supreme Court? How about the War on Drugs, with its violent no-knock raids, unconstitutional urine tests, and puppycides. How about New York City, which is frisking more black men every year than there are black men in New York City?

And it goes deeper than that. The Institute for Justice just published a report on how licensing bullies business owners. The EPA was only last month told they could not bully homeowners with compliance orders that force them to do the EPA’s bidding under threats of bankrupting fines. Every new titan of industry, from Amazon to Yahoo, quickly finds that they will be bullied like hell if they don’t play the Washington game.

You want to talk about bullying? Video was just released showing the brutal and fatal police beating of Kelly Thomas. Have you seen this video on the national news? Has it gotten a hundredth of the coverage that something Mitt Romney did half a century ago has gotten?

What the government does on a daily basis — what it will continue to do under either of the Presidential candidates — is far more of a concern to me than what Mitt Romney did when he was an arrogant jerk-ass teenager. And it is encourage, carried out and sanctioned by adults who continually insist that all this is for our own good.

This is bullshit. This is a distraction. This is one of the stupidest stories to emerge in the election. I can only imagine what ridiculous idiocy will surface next week.

Post Scriptum: You want to talk about Presidential bullies? Read up on the Left’s much-beloved Lyndon Johnson sometime.

57 comments

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  1. Seattle Outcast says:

    Get back to me when the stories come out about him beating the living hell out of other kids on regular basis.

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  2. salinger says:

    Get back to me when the stories come out about him beating the living hell out of other kids on regular basis.

    Exactly – or if maybe he ate some dog meat when he was 8 years old and living in Indonesia – let’s get our priorities straight!

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  3. West Virginia Rebel says:

    Don’t forget his cocaine use…

    Meanwhile, Obama is busy looking for dirt on legitimate businessmen.
    West Virginia Rebel recently posted..The Taxman Comes CallingMy Profile

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  4. Poosh says:

    Exactly – or if maybe he ate some dog meat when he was 8 years old and living in Indonesia – let’s get our priorities straight!

    What a thick thing to say. You know perfectly well that “story” comes about as an ironic retort to an attack, just like this one, on Romney.

    If this is is true – about Romney – then he’s redeemed himself I think quite nicely. And a bout 1/3 of any given school are bullies so he’s hardly in the minority. As Hal says, teens are arseholes – the only question is, “do they grow out of it?”

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  5. Hal_10000 says:

    You know, I don’t often say this: Rush nailed it:

    http://althouse.blogspot.com/2012/05/mitt-romney-was-not-at-chappaquiddick.html

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  6. Mississippi Yankee says:

    Hal Glad you posted that Rush bit. It hits most of the issues that were hidden for years by a compliant press.

    Also Mitt didn’t push a poor young black girl (or a composite of poor young black girls) in high school just so he could remain ‘primo negro’ of his clique.

    /Bill Ayres wrote it, Obama claimed it, I believe it/

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  7. InsipiD says:

    They also tried to point out a past affiliation to polygamist Mormon fundamentalists in his past (maybe his great-grandparents) without pointing out that Barack Obama, Sr. was a polygamist himself.

    To me the biggest story about candidates’ pasts, family, and affiliation is not who is there, but who is most admired. A look at Obama’s family, writings, and works shows that his dad made a big impression and is who he admired. This is someone who I don’t think Jr. ever lived with, ran around with different women, married several of them, and spent much of his post-educational life trying to spread communism in Kenya. His mother dragged him halfway around the world chasing jobs and men that she’d enjoy and finally left him to be raised by his grandparents. He seems to admire his mom. Reverend Wright spent his entire career building a theology based on class warfare and racist hatred. Obama alternately embraced and feigned ignorance of Wright, but never would throw him under the bus. He clearly admired Wright. He absurdly called the Falklands “the Maldives” to pander to an increasingly socialist South America and ignored what that meant to our long-time ally Britain, especially since the residents clearly want to remain British. He admires communism above self-determined rule. Two of the most admirable people in his past, the white grandparents who took him in and gave him the only really normal years of his childhood are almost never mentioned. When they are, it’s usually in a context of proving stereotypes about whites are true because they applied to his white grandparents. He’ll throw good, hard-working people under the nearest bus and instead try to encourage admiration of people who have never done anything really worth admiring.

    And bullying? Race Card is bullying. Skip Gates tried to bully a cop into not investigating an incident that’s worth investigating and Obama loved that. Obama misquoted a private citizen’s quotes on student loans to make the right look cruel. He has many times ruled beyond laws of checks and balances to get something done that he thought was more important than following the laws of the country. That’s bullying 310,000,000 people, whether they agree with him or not. Obama loves to bully if it plays to his own crowd.

    And for the ultimate in bullying, disrespect, and devaluing human life, look no further than the deficit. Obama’s deficit for FY 2011 was 1.56 trillion dollars. The US per capita income that year was $41,663. The deficit alone represents the entire income of 37,443,295 people. Not the budget, the deficit. Assuming the average person has a working career of about 35 years, that deficit represented the entire lives of over 1,000,000 people. How could he possibly justify his deficit spending as being worth the entire life’s work of over a million people every year?

    But I’m sure that Romney’s the real bully.

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  8. CM says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

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  9. CM says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

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  10. Section8 says:

    It also didn’tt help that Ann Romney had pointed to her husband’s fun-and-games prankster high school days to show us “the real Mitt”.
    Anyway,

    As it turns out we’re not voting for Prom King here, so for most of us. BFD. Of course, I’d say mind your own business, but with the way things seem to be going with Democrats, you’d probably be able to cast a vote here before too long and get away with it unfortunately.

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  11. CM says:

    His response almost suggests he’s taking advice from Cain’s disastrous PR people.
    Too far out from the election to have any real impact anyway (so yeah, BFD). The media are effectively killing time at this point. Still, as I say – seems like a missed opportunity to turn it around and speak out against bullying. I’m sure that would have made a much more positive impact on the independents he seeks.

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  12. Kimpost says:

    [...] but with the way things seem to be going with Democrats, you’d probably be able to cast a vote here before too long and get away with it unfortunately.

    ?

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  13. balthazar says:

    Kim,

    With hes commenting on how sickeningly easy it is to vote for someone else and/or get your name registered without being qualified to vote.

    Basically If the DEMS had their way you, yes you kim, could vote in our elections.

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  14. Kimpost says:

    You wouldn’t like that, would you? :)

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  15. Dave D says:

    Bal:

    Our secretary of state here in Michigan is trying to cleanup the voting rolls. She has found that many counties have OVER 100% registered voters on the books. Dead, illegals, felons, etc…… I guess we are too close to Chicago?

    She stated this AM on WJR that the federal government will NOT help her with this task. For whatever reason……

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  16. balthazar says:

    Well Kim, seeing as how you arnt legal to vote in US elections, NO i wouldnt. If you were a citizen, sure have at it, I dont care what your views are, if you are legal to vote, vote.

    The point is that it is so ridiculously easy to vote FOR someone since there are no controls of who votes for the registered name.

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  17. Kimpost says:

    I’ve said it before, but I have no problems repeating myself. I have no problems with voter ID-laws. Just subsidize the ID, and I’m cool. I’m generally in favor of making voting as easy as possible, but not at the expense of the integrity of the system.

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  18. Mississippi Yankee says:

    I’m generally in favor of making voting as easy as possible, but not at the expense of the integrity of the system.

    Kim

    In the concept of voter fraud what exactly does that fucking mean? The integrity of every election becomes compromised in the presence of voter fraud. And every state that has voter ID laws allows for people that can not afford to get a usual form of ID such as drivers license ect…

    Or do you equate expense with po’ peebles schlepping downtown to get their free ID? Hell it’s in the same damn building as the welfare office.

    So while you’re in favor of the “concept” of voter ID how do YOU feel the masses should obtain this ID?

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  19. CM says:

    I think the issue comes down to working out:
    (a) how much voter fraud actually exists
    (b) how much harder does voting need to be to justify reducing (a) by any meaningful margin.

    If (a) is insignificant by any reasonable measure now, then don’t make voting harder. If anything, make it easier, unless the proposed measures can be shown to increase fraud to a meaningful level.
    If (b) is found to be at more than an insignificant level, will the proposed measures to improve it making voting harder, and if they will, does the reduction in voter fraud justify them.

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  20. Mississippi Yankee says:

    If (b) is found to be at more than an insignificant level, will the proposed measures to improve it making voting harder, and if they will, does the reduction in voter fraud justify them.

    HELL YES!

    I’ve watched you and your little dog dance on the head of this pin before. I feel soiled when ever I read y’alls dishonest double-speak on the matter.

    Operation Veritas documents voter fraud “every frikin’ day”. And JamesO’Keefe films it over and over and over whereever he goes. He was even handed Eric ‘gaddamn Holder’s ballot in a Washington DC polling station.

    Project Veritas

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  21. Kimpost says:

    I don’t know. I’m sure you could do lots of shit to encourage people to get an ID. In Sweden you usually have your first ID well before your teens, so I guess it’s a matter of making it part of the culture. How about a free ID provided by the school system? How about letting actual welfare offices provide them? “No ID, no welfare”.

    It will never be as easy as voting without an ID, but I’m sure it could become close. While you’re at it, why not remove the “registering to vote” process? 18 + citizen + ID should equal being able to stumble into a voting booth on election day. Registering first doesn’t make sense.

    CM’s right overall, of course. I’d add another parameter, though. Even if fraud probably is small, the integrity of the system is threatened by the notion that it might not be. People need to trust the system, so I’m fine with some tweaks.

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  22. Kimpost says:

    HELL YES!

    I’ve watched you and your little dog dance on the head of this pin before. I feel soiled when ever I read y’alls dishonest double-speak on the matter.

    Wow. Just relax, will you?

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  23. Mississippi Yankee says:

    How about a free ID provided by the school system? How about letting actual welfare offices provide them? “No ID, no welfare”.

    They might pull your ‘commie card’ for remarks like that.

    CM’s right overall, of course. I’d add another parameter, though. Even if fraud probably is small,

    No he isn’t, and you are once again dancing around the issue. And telling me to ‘relax’ while the left perverts our election process is beyond suspicious. Vigilance, not a lackadaisical don’t give a shit attitude is what is needed Sweedy

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  24. Kimpost says:

    Fuck, you’re moody. The commie is on your side on this, at least when it comes to seeking solutions. Who cares if we don’t agree on the severity of the problem? You’re acting as if I was saying that the problem is so small, that we don’t need to address it.

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  25. Xetrov says:

    While you’re at it, why not remove the “registering to vote” process? 18 + citizen + ID should equal being able to stumble into a voting booth on election day. Registering first doesn’t make sense.

    I can’t speak for all fifty states, but in the two I’ve lived in (Arizona, and Utah), Registering to vote is as easy as checking a box on your drivers license application that you want to register. No other forms or anything needed.

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  26. JimK says:

    DISCLAIMER: I have no evidence for the following supposition. So, you know, no need to scream for “links.”

    I suspect that voter registration benefits the political parties (whichever ones exist in any system that requires registration). You need to be at least committed to politics enough to register (for the most part). This betters the chances that politically faithful will participate, and in higher percentages than the general population/true undecided voters. Thus giving your faithful more weight in the “democratic” process.

    The reason I believe this is that were I sitting down to design a voting process that would benefit me and still give the appearance of not being manipulated? This is specifically what I’d start with. You cut a huge amount of unpredictable people out of the mix almost immediately and improve your own odds. Sure, you;re also helping your “opponents” at the same time, but that’s something you can predict with reasonable accuracy.

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  27. Kimpost says:

    I can’t speak for all fifty states, but in the two I’ve lived in (Arizona, and Utah), Registering to vote is as easy as checking a box on your drivers license application that you want to register. No other forms or anything needed.

    If you have to do that separately from the actual vote (say, days or weeks earlier), then it sure seems like a complication, even if you might not think that it’s a big one. Personally, I mostly just wonder why registration is needed at all? Why isn’t it automatic? Having said that, JimK might be on to something.

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  28. Seattle Outcast says:

    Personally, I mostly just wonder why registration is needed at all?

    To at least take a stab at reducing election fraud by limiting the number of times someone can vote. “Vote early and often” is a liberal creed in the USA.

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  29. salinger says:

    Voter fraud is found to be just about non-existent no matter who does the study.

    5 year Bush administration study

    Another relevant article

    This seems to be a matter of faith of religious proportions by some on the right since facts don’t change their belief. The number of actual fraud cases documented are so low (even when the research is done by the Bush administration’s justice department) that they are barely measurable.

    I wonder if this same cadre of believers would welcome gun laws imposed on the general population based on criminal offenses by similarly small numbers?

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  30. sahrab says:

    Isnt that cute Salinger’s spouting this crap again… ok then Tit for Tat

    Busting the Myth “Voter Fraud is a Myth”

    And Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens agrees.
    in a 6-3 majority opinion upholding an Indiana voter ID law Justice Stevens wrote “That flagrant examples of [voter] fraud…have been documented throughout this Nation’s history by respected historians and journalists…demonstrates that not only is the risk of voter fraud real but that it could affect the outcome of a close election.”

    In fact, the Supreme Court in a 6 to 3 decision, authored by liberal Justice John Paul Stevens, rejected the argument that voter ID laws are discriminatory when it upheld Indiana’s strict voter ID law in 2008.

    In upholding the Indiana law, the Court cited flagrant historical examples of in-person voter fraud as well as the state’s administrative interest in carefully identifying who has voted.

    The Court also noted the state may have a legitimate interest in requiring photo IDs for voters even without evidence of widespread fraud.

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  31. salinger says:

    Tit for Tat

    Nice to see an actual link in support of an argument here – could do without the snarky condescension though – I figure I’ve won an argument as soon as the other party resorts to taunts.

    Even so – you’ve done nothing to show that voter fraud is rampant. You show one case that I would cite as straight out voter fraud with the guy voting 10 times. Looks like the only thing he’s gonna be voting on in the near future is top or bottom bunk in a jail cell.

    Why doesn’t the “There is already a law against it” standard fit here?

    The other two – the woman voting out of her district, could have been an honest mistake – especially if she only cast that one vote – there is no back up info to shed any light on this and a quick search to try and fact check it just links back to the Heritage Foundation blog you’ve cited..

    There is info in the study from the Bush Justice Dept. that a good number of the cases they found were of this kind – honest mistakes where people accidentally voted incorrectly or were unaware that they were voting illegally (the convicted felon who used his prison ID at the polls.) I think this immigrant would fall into the latter as well – seems to be a problem with the person registering the voter.

    I’ve got no problem with folks showing an ID to vote – I just don’t buy the histrionics over fraud.

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  32. Seattle Outcast says:

    Voter fraud is found to be just about non-existent no matter who does the study.

    1960 presidential election (Illinois) and 2004 Washington governor’s race are both perfect examples of the difference between “just about” and “non-existent” – hell,even governor Gregoire admitted that she likely lost the race in reality.

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  33. salinger says:

    Gregoire admitted that she likely lost the race in reality.

    And there is evidence that this was because of widespread voter fraud?

    To paraphrase Joseph Stalin ‘It’s not the people who vote that count, it’s the people who count the votes’.

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  34. sahrab says:

    He also hangs his hat on a news article that uses total cases brought before the court, as proof that voter fraud doesnt occur.

    He ignores the instances of voter fraud (like the ones you cite, as well as the Acorn incidents) that dont have the benefit of coming before a judge. Notice they also reference individual cases of mistakes, as the example of the only type of Voter fraud that could have occurred.

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  35. Kimpost says:

    To at least take a stab at reducing election fraud by limiting the number of times someone can vote. “Vote early and often” is a liberal creed in the USA.

    Automatic registration would be as effective as manual registration in that regard. I can’t cast more votes than one in Sweden. Actually I can, but only one will count. The last one.

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  36. Seattle Outcast says:

    And there is evidence that this was because of widespread voter fraud?

    Oh, hell yes. Oddly enough, about all of it was people that worked in Seattle but lived elsewhere were voting in both places.

    And as you pointed out the “counters” just kept “finding more votes” until she won, and then stopped the endless recounts.

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  37. CM says:

    Nice to see an actual link in support of an argument here – could do without the snarky condescension though – I figure I’ve won an argument as soon as the other party resorts to taunts.

    +1

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  38. Mississippi Yankee says:

    Automatic registration would be as effective as manual registration in that regard. I can’t cast more votes than one in Sweden. Actually I can, but only one will count. The last one.

    Dancing Queen, don’t confuse moody with passionate alinskyite.
    Let me remind you that we (the adults) were discussing voter fraud not voter registration. Plus what you are describing is a national database , something the rat basturd lefties want even less than voter ID.

    In fact, the Supreme Court in a 6 to 3 decision, authored by liberal Justice John Paul Stevens, rejected the argument that voter ID laws are discriminatory when it upheld Indiana’s strict voter ID law in 2008.

    It appears that some sort of a precedent may have been established. Let’s let the SCofUS settle this matter on a national voter ID.

    Nice to see an actual link in support of an argument here – could do without the snarky condescension though – I figure I’ve won an argument as soon as the other party resorts to taunts.

    Forgive me as I’m fairly new around here (only 10 years or so) but I’ve never seen you, or judging from CM’s down-thumbs count, he, ever win an argument here. What am I missing?

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  39. CM says:

    And there we have it – the strength of an argument is judged solely by the number of thumbs down. Nicely summarised MY. At least you’re honest I guess.

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  40. salinger says:

    What am I missing?

    A sense of irony?

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  41. Mississippi Yankee says:

    Hey CM and salinger, people don’t discount you for nothing. And each only get 1 vote! No fraud allowed.

    How does one rack up 8, 9..11 thumbs down when they’re winning? And not Charlie Sheen “winning”?

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  42. CM says:

    Hey CM and salinger, people don’t discount you for nothing.

    They click downvote in lieu of providing substance. They don’t like the fact that we push back when people start throwing personal abuse around. Whatever I post gets a various amount of down-thumbs. Often I’m not even offering an opinion. So the whole thing (which is childish anyway) is rendered completely meaningless. Well, I guess it’s not strictly true – it gives people the ability to demonstrate cowardly behaviour.

    And each only get 1 vote! No fraud allowed.

    ;-)

    How does one rack up 8, 9..11 thumbs down when they’re winning? And not Charlie Sheen “winning”?

    How does clicking downvote instead of partaking in the discussion and providing intelligent responses or rebutal of what I said mean anything? What does clicking downvote when I offer no opinion mean?
    If you went to a forum/blog full of liberals and made an argument and got 5000 downvotes, would you immediately concede that you’d lost the argument? Somehow I doubt it.
    Alex and balthazar post garbage all the time (hey, at least it’s better than downvotes, although I’m sure they both downvote on everything I post), but I’ve yet to see you pick them up on a single thing. So don’t even try to pretend this is about quality. That would be the world’s lamest and most transparently ridiculous argument.

    So to answer your question:

    What am I missing?

    Pretty much everything that matters. You’re far too busy getting personal – involving yourself in mob behaviour trying to drive away people who don’t subscribe to a narrow band of thought.

    Anyway, looks like this ‘Romney-is-a-bully’ story has gone from the news-cycle, replaced by the attempt to bribe Rev Wright.

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  43. Mississippi Yankee says:

    Alex and balthazar post garbage all the time (hey, at least it’s better than downvotes, although I’m sure they both downvote on everything I post), but I’ve yet to see you pick them up on a single thing.

    Wrong Oh Prevaricator of Truths
    I’ve posted comments disagreeing with both these gentlemen although usually on non-essential dictum. But in not one case did either of them respond with a page long essay with non-credible links in support of their position.

    You’re far too busy getting personal – involving yourself in mob behaviour trying to drive away people who don’t subscribe to a narrow band of thought.

    Alinsky Rules aren’t much fun when everyone employs them. Rule #5 just comes so natural to me when your there :)

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  44. CM says:

    Not wrong at all. You’re misunderstood. You pretend your problem is quality but if that was the case you’d pick them up at least as much as you complain about me. I don’t mean in terms of disagreeing, I mean where they horribly misrepresent, lack rationality or logic, act like trolls, and provide no less biased links than I do. So in reality quality isn’t an issue to you.

    I use links carefully, I learned to do that during my years at Moorewatch forums. If they’re opinion pieces I don’t pretend they are fact. If you disagree, then find some examples (and explain how I use them differently to various others). Otherwise I will stand uncorrected.

    Alinsky Rules aren’t much fun when everyone employs them. Rule #5 just comes so natural to me when your there :)

    It’s their, not there. ;-)

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  45. Mississippi Yankee says:

    It’s their, not there. ;-)

    ?

    Did you perhaps mean you’re, not your?

    I’m going to sit out the rest of the dance, my feet hurt. And besides, you have 2 left feet :)

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  46. JimK says:

    They don’t like the fact that we push back when people start throwing personal abuse around

    Oh wow.

    You think you matter to anyone here aside from the two minutes they see your nonsense cluttering up most comment threads.

    That’s ADORABLE!

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  47. CM says:

    Non sequitur.

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  48. CM says:

    Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    You WIN the argument! Congratulations!

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  49. salinger says:

    M.Y.

    A little workshop on that irony thing.

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  50. Mississippi Yankee says:

    salinger:

    A ‘one off’ anecdotal from a left coast fish wrap isn’t even worth a thumb-down.

    weak,weak comeback.

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  51. salinger says:

    A ‘one off’ anecdotal from a left coast fish wrap isn’t even worth a thumb-down.

    Firstly – which of the facts cited in the story can you disprove? If none – then move along.

    Secondly – this is hardly a one off story – the most egregious (and best organized) cases of voter fraud – or rather registration fraud – has been perpetrated by the right. It doesn’t take too much brain power to find the cases. But that’s not what you want – i could list item after item. But you aren’t really against voting fraud – you’re just against the other side doing it.

    In reality – both “sides” are guilty but the main reason for this fraudulent registration no matter who is doing it is basically bounty hunting and has nothing to do with ideology. But that little fact doesn’t play into any convenient talking points.

    The fact that next to none of these fraudulent registrations ever actually lead to fraudulent votes – well that’s an inconvenience too.

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  52. Mississippi Yankee says:

    this is hardly a one off story – the most egregious (and best organized) cases of voter fraud – or rather registration fraud – has been perpetrated by the right. It doesn’t take too much brain power to find the cases.

    salinger

    And if you had followed my link to Project Veritas or just simply ‘google’ “Projrct Veritas” you’d find all of the ideological fraud an honest man would need.

    But if you truly believe both parties are equally guilty then lets get Voter ID up and running ASAP.
    Right’s right,right?

    The fact that next to none of these fraudulent registrations ever actually lead to fraudulent votes – well that’s an inconvenience too.

    I wouldn’t know how to begin to address such a “full on” stupid supposition as this remark. Although the states of New York and Ohio would greatly dispute your ridiculous claim.

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  53. InsipiD says:

    Secondly – this is hardly a one off story – the most egregious (and best organized) cases of voter fraud – or rather registration fraud – has been perpetrated by the right.

    That is absolutely the funniest thing I’ve ever seen passed off as truth in an argument.

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  54. sahrab says:

    Voter fraud is found to be just about non-existent no matter who does the study.

    OOps again

    Not only is the article telling, the bottom 2/3 refutes your idiocy again

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  55. salinger says:

    Not only is the article telling, the bottom 2/3 refutes your idiocy again

    Okay – Florida has a shoddy mechanism with which to purge dead voters from their system (which is being fixed) and one man, 3,000 miles away in Oregon voted for his dead son (and was obviously arrested for the offense).

    Got it – the two are no doubt inextricably linked – excellent detective work. your logic is flawless – thanks so much.

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  56. Mississippi Yankee says:

    salinger

    This article has a little more info then the two are no doubt inextricably linked distraction you’re attempting.

    Here is the bad news. Most states aren’t using the same database that Florida is. In fact, I have heard reports that some election officials won’t even remove voters even when they are presented with a death certificate. That means that voter rolls across the nation still are filled with dead voters, even if Florida is leading the way in detecting and removing them.

    …The incident in Oregon just scratches the surface of the problem. Massachusetts and Mississippi are but two other examples of the dead rising on election day.

    In fact predominantly black counties in Mississippi such as Noxubee Co are constantly cited for dis-enfranchising white voters. Oh and BTW they weren’t real fond of the mexican influx into their fiefdoms either.

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  57. CM says:

    Don’t you ever,ever blame another human being for knocking you for biased links. The Times-Picayune,really, how does the Daily Kos and Democrat Underground feel about it.

    Or PJ Media, or The Daily Caller?
    ;-)

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